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The New Zealand Curriculum.

This site has been developed to support The New Zealand Curriculum


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Possible learning experiences

Although links between specific key competencies and achievement objectives have been provided for each example, language students can be developing all of the key competencies as they work towards the core achievement objectives.

1.

Students select and use language, symbols, and texts, evaluate ideas and information, and decide what would be important or interesting to share with an exchange partner. Because an email exchange is interactive, the key competencies of relating to others, participating and contributing, and managing self are also important to this task (for example, replying to emails by producing real language instead of feeding English to an online translator).

Writing and reading are the main language skills used, but this experience could also involve listening, viewing, speaking, and presenting if the students added audio files and/or video files to their emails.

Using their knowledge of German, students construct an email to an exchange partner as part of an exchange with a school in Germany or with other learners of German. Alternatively, they submit an email to an online forum for learners of German (such as Beyond Borders). They share information and ideas about their lives, interests, and so on, and use cultural knowledge to communicate appropriately. They are starting to recognise ways in which German is organised, for example, how correspondence starts and ends and the use of simple joining words like aber, auch, darum, and denn. This email could be part of correspondence over a longer period of time in a forum or blog context, and it could be enhanced by attaching voice and song recordings and photographs. In a blog or forum context, students could read each other’s exchanges and comment: Hi Martina, Ich spiele auch gern Tennis. Anne (deine Partnerin) und ich spielen jeden Samstag Doppel. Wie findest du Phillip Kohlschreiber?

2.

Students select and use language, symbols, and texts, evaluate ideas and information, and choose features of the place they live in that would be important or interesting to share with German students visiting New Zealand.

Writing, speaking, and presenting are the main skills used, but this experience could also involve listening, reading, and viewing.

Students participate and contribute by sharing information. They reflect on special places around their town or city and identify an activity for each location. They are also beginning to voice their opinions. Students play a domino game in groups or pairs, matching each place with reasons for visiting it.

They then construct a text to tell their exchange partner about their home town or city and record it as an audio file or podcast or they make a pamphlet for German-speaking students visiting their town. To do this, they describe aspects of their own immediate environment, express personal interests (reasons they would visit places in their town or village), and compare and contrast cultural practices, for example, the fact that they are not allowed in pubs without adult supervision before the age of eighteen.

3.

In pairs, students select and use language, symbols, and text to construct a playlet in which they invite a student visiting from Germany do something with them, including instructions on where to meet.

Because this is a pair activity to be performed before an audience of other learners, it includes aspects of the key competencies of relating to others and participating and contributing. Speaking, listening, presenting, and viewing are the main skills used, but this experience could also involve writing and reading.


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