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Learning Languages curriculum guides navigation


The New Zealand Curriculum.

This site has been developed to support The New Zealand Curriculum


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Possible learning experiences

Although links between specific key competencies and achievement objectives have been provided for each example, language students can be developing all of the key competencies as they work towards the core achievement objectives.

Selecting and using language, symbols, and texts tocommunicate – students receive and produce information.

Managing self and relating to others – students produce language and respond to others.

Participating and contributing in communities – students show social awareness when interacting with others.

Reading, speaking, listening, viewing

  • Working in pairs and using objects they are familiar with (classroom objects), students play a memory game by hiding one object and asking in French, “Can you guess what is missing?” For example, the teacher could place ten to twelve different objects on the table, making sure the students are familiar with the French names for most of them (or the items could be labelled in French). Introduce only a few new items at a time. Taking turns, the students name the items by using formulaic expressions: Je vois; je peux voir; il y a; la-bas se trouve
  • One student directs their partner to close their eyes, then removes an item and asks: Qu’est-ce qui manque? The second student replies with formulaic expressions: Il manque le/la …; Je crois que c’est; Je vois le/lamais pas le/la ...

Selecting and using language to communicate – students receive and produce information.

Managing self and relating to others – students produce and respond to others.

Participating and contributing in communities – students show social awareness when interacting with others.

Reading, speaking, listening, performing

  • Communicating in French as they seek to find a hidden object, students move around the classroom (this is a game of hide-and-seek). Working in pairs or threes, the student who is seeking says, before doing so: Je vais vers …; J e me dirige vers …; Je veux aller vers …; J’ouvre le sac. The other students only give feedback once the action is completed: C’est faux; C’est froid; Tu ne dois pas … Make sure each student has time to complete the activity (keep an eye on the time).

Selecting and using language to communicate – students receive and produce information.

Managing self and relating to others – students produce and respond to others.

Participating and contributing in communities – students show social awareness when interacting with others.

Reading, speaking, listening, performing

  • Communicating in French as they produce a picture, pairs of students tell each other what to draw and where to draw it, using formulaic expressions for requests: Je voudrais; S’il te plaît; Je veux; maintenant il faut aller/faire/dessiner… This can be very funny, for example, when students are working on body parts with the drawing partner wearing a blindfold – this activity could be entitled “self portrait”.

Selecting and using language to communicate – students receive and produce information.

Managing self and relating to others – students produce and respond to others.

Participating and contributing in communities – students show social awareness when interacting with others.

Speaking, listening, performing

  • Communicating in French to lead a folk dance session, students use formulaic expressions to call the moves. France has a wide and diverse choice of folk dances, and this topic allows this cultural aspect to be introduced. Most of the farandole dances can be taught by leading the group and showing the moves, relating them to easy words, for example, les petits ponts, l’escargot, l’aiguillée, la ligne, la queue leu-leu. The session uses only formulaic expressions, for example, tenez-vous la main, en cercle, par couple, par deux, marchez, comptez, arretez, allez, commencez.

Selecting and using language to communicate – students receive and produce information.

Managing self and relating to others – students produce and respond to others.

Participating and contributing in communities – students show social awareness when interacting with others.

Reading, speaking, listening, presenting

  • Using the familiar expressions and everyday vocabulary they have learned (for example, words for colours, clothes, and family numbers), students work in pairs to create the “perfect family photo for a wedding”. Each pair will work with a barrier to stop them from looking at each other’s piece of paper. They work on drawing the same family photo, describing, in French, each person and their clothes.

Selecting and using language to communicate – students receive and produce information.

Managing self and relating to others – students produce and respond to others.

Participating and contributing in communities – students show social awareness when interacting with others.

Reading, speaking, listening, performing

  • The students role-play a situation in a café where two customers order drinks from a waiter who only has certain drinks available (initially the customers do not know this). This activity needs to be carefully prepared so that students will use greetings, farewells, and polite expressions for requests and denials. It can be expanded to a restaurant situation, dealing with food, choice of table, special requests (for example, relating to a blind person, wheelchairs, the smoking area, or a dog in the restaurant): Que désirez-vous?; Et avec ça?; Et pour vous?; Désolé je n’ai pas de …; Je n’ai plus de …; Voici; Bien sûr; Tout de suite; Avec plaisir.

A French game would also need the following vocabulary:

À toi de jouer. Your turn to play.
À ton tour. Your turn.
Tu triches. You’re cheating.
À moi. My turn.
Pioche. Go fish/pick (something).
Bonne pioche. Good pick.
Lance le dé. Roll the dice.
Avance ton pion. Move your counter forwards.
Recule ton pion. Move your counter backwards.

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